ACL Reconstruction | Knee Arthroscopy | Knee Replacement | Milton | Norwood | New England Baptist Hospital
     
 

 

ACL Reconstruction

ACL Reconstruction | Knee Arthroscopy | Knee Replacement | Milton | Norwood | New England Baptist HospitalThe ACL (anterior cruciate ligament) is one of the most commonly injured ligaments in the knee. Running diagonally through the middle of the joint, the ACL works together with three other ligaments to connect the femur (upper leg bone) to the tibia (lower leg bone). People who play sports that are likely to damage the knee—such as basketball, football, skiing and soccer—are at greatest risk for injuring the ACL. Only about 30% of ACL injuries result from direct contact with another player or object. The rest occur when the athlete decelerates while cutting, pivoting, or sidestepping; lands awkwardly; or plays recklessly. About half of ACL injuries are accompanied by damage to the meniscus, cartilage, bone or other ligaments in the knee.

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Knee Arthroscopy

Arthroscopy is a minimally invasive procedure that allows doctors to examine tissues inside the knee. It is often performed to confirm a diagnosis made after a physical examination and other imaging tests such as MRI, CT or X-rays.

During an arthroscopic procedure, a thin fiberoptic light, magnifying lens and tiny television camera are inserted into the knee, allowing your orthopaedic surgeon to examine the joint in great detail.

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Knee Replacement

 Knee Replacement | Milton | Norwood | New England Baptist HospitalIn a total knee replacement, the damaged ends of the bones are removed and replaced with a prosthesis made of metal and plastic. A partial knee replacement for patients with damage on only one side of the joint can delay or prevent a total knee replacement. These artificial parts allow the joint to move smoothly so the patient experiences pain relief and a better quality of life. Knee replacement can also help restore motion to the joint, straighten the leg and improve stability.

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Shoulder Impingement

Shoulder Impingement | Milton | Norwood | New England Baptist HospitalOne of the most common causes of shoulder pain, impingement occurs when the front of the shoulder blade rubs against the rotator cuff as a person lifts his/her arm. The rotator cuff is a group of muscles and tendons that stabilizes the shoulder and permits lifting and rotating movements. If the rotator cuff weakens or is injured, the bone of the upper arm (humerus) can lift up, pinching the rotator cuff against the shoulder blade. The muscles can then swell further, creating a vicious cycle of pain and weakness that will not improve without intervention.

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Labral Injury

The socket of the shoulder, or glenoid, is covered with a layer of cartilage called the labrum that cushions and deepens the socket to help stabilize the joint. Traumatic injuries and repetitive overhead shoulder movements can tear the labrum, leading to pain, limited motion, instability and weakness in the joint.

Symptoms of a labral injury can include shoulder pain and a popping or clicking sensation when the shoulder is moved, as well as rotator cuff weakness. One of the most common labral injuries is called a SLAP lesion, a tear where the biceps tendon meets the glenoid. Another kind of labral injury is a Bankart lesion, where the labrum pulls off the front of the socket. This happens most often when the shoulder dislocates. If a Bankart tear doesn't heal properly, it can facilitate future dislocations, instability, weakness and pain.

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Shin Splints

Shin splints, or medial tibial stress syndrome, are a common exercise-related condition characterized by pain along or just behind the shins. Pain occurs about two-thirds of the way down the leg below the knee, spans several inches, and tends to worsen with activity. This discomfort results from inflammation of the thin layer of tissue covering the tibia, as well as from the bone itself and two of the muscles that attach to it (the soleus muscle and flexor digitorum longus, which help you push off your foot and flex your toes).

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